Movie reviews of Garry Arnot

These are all the movies and series that Garry has reviewed. Read more at: Cinema Perspective.

Number of movie reviews: 186 / 186

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Between Two Worlds is a well-made and very well-acted commentary on the issues working-class people can come up against, made even more timely by the cost-of-living crisis we are currently experiencing. However, due to the iffy optics of its central character, the film leans too heavily on the side of ‘poverty porn’, lacking the emotional gut-punch you would expect from this type of tale. Review

6.0

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18 may

18 may

Despite its flaws, it remains a refreshing, entertaining antidote to the more mainstream efforts of this ilk, and the Daniels are an absolute credit to original, independent filmmaking. Review

6.0

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9 may

9 may

A bold and accomplished sophomore picture that signals its writer and director Nathalie Biancheri as one to watch, Wolf is a visceral character drama that intensifies her cinematic voice to a howl. Review

8.0

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30 april

30 apr

Splashing his well-earned creative currency on a grandiose pagan pagger, Robert Eggers is visibly growing in confidence and The Northman only strengthens his stature. With just the right amount of weird, it’s an ambitious, almighty feat of filmmaking that sacrifices none of the visionary director’s mythical madness. Review

8.0

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21 april

21 apr

Off the back of an often stuffy and serious awards season, popcorn flick The Lost City is a fantastic antidote to this; mindless but very entertaining. It heavily relies upon the screen presence and winning spark of Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum, but they definitely deliver the goods, reminding us why they’re both class acts in this field of cinema. Review

7.0

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17 april

17 apr

A striking sophomore effort from director Audrey Diwan, Happening is an incredibly challenging yet vital piece of work that presents itself as a timely social-issue thriller. Not for the faint-hearted but well worth watching through your hands in horror. Review

10

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30 march

30 mar

A subtle study of romance within the complicated confines of modern city life, Jacques Audiard’s Paris, 13th District is a beautifully devised monochrome masterpiece, and introduces the exciting new talent of Lucie Zhang to the big screen. Review

10

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27 march

27 mar

Presenting a refreshing modern-day slant on the genre, The Worst Person in the World is a romance dramedy that should have universal appeal. Trier has completed his triptych of Nordic tales with a flourish, and a winning portrayal from Renate Reinsve turns ordinary problems into extraordinary cinema. Review

8.0

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22 march

22 mar

Leaning into the farcical nature of its story, Howard J. Ford’s The Ledge makes the very most of the platform it gets to play on by crafting some gripping set pieces. As the villains become almost pantomime-esque in their portrayals, it makes it fun and easy to root for Brittany Ashworth in this amusingly far-fetched thriller. Review

6.0

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11 march

11 mar

At the beating heart of the piece is an emotionally charged central turn from Arcelia Ramirez. The social-realist style and sensitivity of the skilful director helps to draw out a very natural, moving performance, elevating La Civil from the expectations of the premise. Review

8.0

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10 march

10 mar

At the dark heart of it all is, of course, Robert Pattinson, who consistently makes interesting choices in the parts he takes on. He’s perfect for Matt Reeves’ emotionally twisted, brooding incarnation of The Batman, or simply ‘vengeance’ as he identifies himself as to his hapless victims. If the writing improves for the chapters that will undoubtedly follow, it may well become his greatest role to date. Review

6.0

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9 march

9 mar

Disappointingly flat but certainly not without its merits, Nanni Moretti’s Three Floors is a mixed bag of misery-porn. Review

5.0

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8 march

8 mar

Let True Things wash over you but take another shower immediately afterwards; it’s a deeply unpleasant but completely intoxicating experience that masterfully captures the ugly insecurities and uncertainties of a toxic love affair. Review

8.0

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26 february

26 feb

While the script’s wry sense of humour might not always stick the landing with international audiences, the material is elevated by Donutil’s dedicated and vital performance as the no-nonsense protagonist. Review

6.0

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26 february

26 feb

The execution of its themes may be a little on the nose, but Ross McCall introduces himself as a visually inventive director with a flair for presenting vicious brutality. Review

7.0

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30 january

30 jan

Proving that he can be just as impactful as a director as he is an on-screen presence, Flag Day is a compelling father-daughter drama from Sean Penn. Leaning into his own experience, he injects genuine emotion into this rugged adaptation’s pivotal relationship. Review

8.0

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19 january

19 jan

More of a big screen art-installation than a movie, Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Memoria is a challenging, bamboozling experience but when immersed in its oddities, it can also be thought-provoking and bizarrely rewarding. Review

6.0

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17 january

17 jan

A sweet and sweaty tribute to aimless adolescence, Paul Thomas Anderson’s Licorice Pizza serves up a satisfying slice of 70s nostalgia and introduces two future stars of cinema to our screens. Review

8.0

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5 january

5 jan

Affectionately crafted and beautifully portrayed by its formidable cast, Belfast brilliantly illustrates the closeness of community, then proceeds to show how quickly it can be ravaged by terrible conflict. However, by telling the troublesome tale through the bright eyes of an imaginative child, it’s a poignant, comical reflection of Branagh’s boyhood. Review

8.0

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2 january

2 jan

C’mon C’mon marks another kind-hearted hit from Mike Mills, his affectionate writing and direction providing a platform that showcases the acting talents of Phoenix and Norman. This effort has a little less to say for itself than his previous films, but it’s a pleasant experience to eavesdrop on its conversations. Review

6.0

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30 december

30 dec

King Richard is a bloated spectacle of self-righteousness made tolerable only by a handful of well measured performances. Review

4.0

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30 november

30 nov

Paul Schrader doubles down on his career-defining themes of moral responsibility with The Card Counter, dealing us an intense and absorbing exploration of fear and self-loathing through the lens of a brilliant, no-limits gambling film. Review

8.0

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8 november

8 nov

A cinematic spectacle of grandiose sound and scale, director Denis Villeneuve delivers a thought-provoking, immersive experience that slowly but assertively sets the scene for the next chapter of the adventure. Review

8.0

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28 october

28 oct

As films set on muddy country retreats go, Pablo Larraín’s Spencer has more in common with The Shining than The Princess Bride and it’s all the better for it. Suspenseful, experimental, and a hell of a lot funnier than you might expect, it’s a nightmarish vision of a fairytale gone horribly awry. Review

8.0

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18 october

18 oct

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