Movie reviews of Jeremy Lebens

These are all the movies and series that Jeremy has reviewed. Read more at: The Daily Rotation.

Number of movie reviews: 300 / 300

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Performance-driven and quiet, Thomas Bezucha's Let Him Go is a slow burn Western by location, but really just a drama about identity, never letting go and the strength of family. The action is minimal and mostly stuffed into the final 15 minutes, but I didn’t mind the buildup. Review

7.5

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7 november

7 nov

Jacob Chase adapts his short film Larry to a full-length feature with Come Play with technical skill and a clear understanding of how to capture scares effectively. Unfortunately, the plot is thin and stretched out past its expiration date, leaving for a film that doesn't know what to do with its running time, despite featuring curious creature design and a cast of more-than-capable performers. Review

6.8

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1 november

1 nov

Justin Benson & Aaron Moorhead's Synchronic is a tightly-scripted time travel film that wastes not a single moment. It's exciting and unexpected, capturing time through a reflective and thematically rich perspective. Anthony Mackie gives the single best performance of his career in what is easily one of the best films of 2020. Review

9.0

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27 october

27 oct

The Empty Man subverts all expectations, delivering an exceptionally made slow-burn thriller that tugs at the very fabrics of reality through David Prior's distinct writing/directing and a dedicated performance from James Badge Dale. Review

8.0

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27 october

27 oct

Michael Matthews' Love and Monsters is that rare overly-positive take on the apocalypse, blending together humor and light action/adventure to make for an emotional journey. Star Dylan O'Brien gives a charming and notable performance. Review

8.5

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22 october

22 oct

On the Rocks is light-hearted and sweet, capturing an energetic relationship between a daughter and her father thanks to the on-screen chemistry between Bill Murray and Rashida Jones. Writer/director Sofia Coppola keeps things simple, delivering a story that feels familiar, yet benefits from its lived-in approach. Review

7.7

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14 october

14 oct

Robert De Niro remains oddly engaged throughout most of The War with Grandpa's running time, which makes the film slightly amusing at times, but mostly a test of patience and one's tolerance for pain. War often requires great sacrifice and with that comes great loss. Do yourself a favor and accept defeat on this one. Review

5.2

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10 october

10 oct

Brandon Cronenberg's Possessor is a stylish hybrid, blending together high-concept sci-fi with full-blown body horror. It's frightening, disturbing and intriguing all in one -- thanks to Cronenberg's unflinching vision, Andrea Riseborough's committed performance and a series of gore-heavy sequences that will implant into your brain for years to come... Review

8.5

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4 october

4 oct

John Hyams' Alone is a razor-sharp thriller, capitalizing on its cat-and-mouse premise and wooded location to make for a film that feels familiar, yet packs a heavy punch. Jules Willcox and Marc Menchaca turn what could've been just another kidnapped vs abductor showdown into a slick slice of horror fun. Review

7.5

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27 september

27 sep

Andrew Cohn's The Last Shift is a promising debut feature for the writer/director. Richard Jenkins and Shane Paul McGhie display good chemistry, filling in each respective role with enough substance to warrant watching their relationship unfold, but the film lacks a closing punch, deflating on itself during the last act. Review

6.8

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26 september

26 sep

William Olsson's Lost Girls & Love Hotels captures the vibrant life of Tokyo with lush cinematography and a dense, yet distant performance from Alexandra Daddario. The film moves at the pace of a snail and winds up just as lost as the film's protagonist, struggling to make its point, despite showing technical skill on behalf of Olsson and his crew. Review

6.2

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19 september

19 sep

Antebellum is ambitiously framed and impeccably shot, acting as part blunt reflection and part trippy time-loop hybrid. It's messy, shocking and needed all the same. Hats off to both Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz for going all the way with it. Review

7.5

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19 september

19 sep

The Broken Hearts Gallery is addictively charming, smart and sweet, capitalizing on a simple premise with authenticity and heart from its leads and supporting cast. Review

8.0

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11 september

11 sep

Christopher Nolan's latest globe-trotting sci-fi thriller Tenet is an unbalanced, albeit ambitious piece of work. Think Memento and Primer, only with a larger budget and broader strokes, occasionally striking that same mind-bending magic as Inception, but mostly leaning too hard on its visual flare and forced "event cinema" architecture that Nolan is known for. Review

7.7

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1 september

1 sep

Sang-ho Yeon's Peninsula is a far cry from Train to Busan, failing to capture lighting in a bottle once again, instead suffering from general sequel tendencies, including more action and less story. The budget seems to have increased, but the charm and magic is all but lost. Review

6.5

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30 august

30 aug

Megan Fox is surprisingly the best part about Rogue, which balances action and suspense on a simple, yet effective premise. The CGI is questionable, but understandable, while the film's occasionally slow pacing holds it back from becoming something more memorable. Review

6.7

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29 august

29 aug

Josh Boone's The New Mutants is an interesting mess of mutant drama, not quite leaning into the horror elements enough, oddly bouncing back-and-forth in tone and execution. It's one of those films that you admire for swinging for the fences, despite it striking out almost immediately and in disastrous fashion. Review

6.3

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28 august

28 aug

Derrick Borte's Unhinged hits like a Mack truck with its foot hard on the gas, fueled by a Russell Crowe performance that's disturbing and full of inner-rage. This might not feel like the most appropriate movie to release theatrically right now, but the film will definitely shock you and keep your eyes glued to the screen. Review

7.5

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21 august

21 aug

Gregor Jordan's Dirt Music is beautifully shot, capturing the lush scenery of Australia in a way that provides for a gorgeous backdrop to a somewhat stalled romance that lacks a connection between its distant two leads, Kelly Macdonald and Garrett Hedlund. Review

6.5

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20 august

20 aug

Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman's Project Power is crazy fun, blending together slick action and a wild concept to make for a thrilling dose of adrenaline. Jamie Foxx and Joseph Gordon-Levitt work well together, but Dominique Fishback is the real winner, delivering a performance that demands your attention and proves valuable throughout the entire film. Review

8.0

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18 august

18 aug

Scott Speer's Endless is an occasionally above average romantic drama, lifted up by reliable and authentic performances from both Alexandra Shipp and Nicholas Hamilton. Unfortunately, the film does very little with its premise, failing to take advantage of its unique approach, instead settling for cliche romance anchored by weightless decisions. Review

6.3

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16 august

16 aug

Egor Abramenko's Sputnik features impressive special effects and an even better creature design that elevates the film's lacking story. Think Splice with shady Russian government undertones that make way for a film that's more bark than bite. Review

6.8

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14 august

14 aug

Amy Seimetz's She Dies Tomorrow is a timely and effective psychological thriller that blends together the uncertainty of death and our own mortality with the concept of spreading fear and panic. It's probably not the best movie to watch during a virus pandemic, but damn if it doesn't send chills up your spine. Review

6.5

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13 august

13 aug

Brandon Trost's An American Pickle is obvious social commentary on America's cancel culture, anchored by a weirdly straight-faced Seth Rogen playing double-role duties. The film isn't all that funny, nor is it eye-opening in its not-so-subtle jabs at the world's current state. This is far from premium exclusive HBO Max content. Review

6.0

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10 august

10 aug

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